2017 Faculty Survey

The 2017 TRIP Faculty Survey surveyed scholars of international relations in 36 countries and 14 languages to examine teaching and research trends and foreign policy views in the IR discipline. TRIP surveys all international relations scholars employed at a college or university who have an affiliation with a political science department or school of public policy and who teach or conduct research on issues that cross international borders. A full summary of the methodology can be found in “International Relations in the U.S. Academy" (ISQ, 2011). The reports for the TRIP faculty surveys in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2011 and 2014 can be found here.

Explore the 2017 TRIP Faculty Survey results on our interactive dashboard.

View the full topline report for the U.S. survey here.
View the full topline report for the international survey (broken out by region) here.

Methodology

We seek to identify and survey all faculty members at colleges and universities in 36 countries who do research in the IR sub-field of political science and/or who teach international relations courses. The overwhelming majority of our respondents have jobs in departments of political science, politics, government, social science, international relations, international studies, or in professional schools associated with universities. Given our definition of "IR scholar" – individuals with an active affiliation with a university, college, or professional school – we excluded researchers currently employed in government, private firms, or think tanks (except where instructed otherwise by our country partners). Additionally, our definition does not include scholars at professional schools of international affairs who study economics, sociology, law, or other disciplines. As in previous years, we attempted to include any scholar who taught or did research on trans-border issues as they relate to some aspect of politics.

We identified the population of faculty to be surveyed in all 36 countries using similar methods. We identified IR scholars at schools through a systematic series of web searches, emails, and communications with departments and individual scholars. We also consulted with our country partners to ensure that these lists were complete. We identified a total of 13,482 individuals in the thirty-six countries in this report who met the TRIP criteria for inclusion. Of these individuals, 3,784 responded for a response rate of 28.07 percent.

We continue to code free response entries in the survey and conduct post-hoc analysis of the survey sample to ensure its integrity. As these processes continue, we will update the data to reflect any changes.

How to cite 2017 Faculty Survey data

Maliniak, Daniel, Susan Peterson, Ryan Powers, and Michael J. Tierney. 2017. TRIP 2017 Faculty Survey. Teaching, Research, and International Policy Project, Williamsburg, VA: Global Research Institute. Available at https://trip.wm.edu/.

Country Partners

Argentina
Arlene B. Tickner (Universidad del Rosario)

Australia
Tom Chodor (Monash University)
Richard Devetak (University of Queensland)
Jacqui True (Monash University)

Austria
Thomas Risse (Free University of Berlin)
Wiebke Wemheuer-Vogelaar (Free University of Berlin)

Belgium
TRIP Principal Investigators (no local partner)

Brazil
Arlene B. Tickner (Universidad del Rosario)

Canada
Phillippe Lagasse (Carleton University)
Jonathan Paquin (Laval University)
Steve Saideman (Carleton University)

Chile
Eduardo Carreño (Universidad de Chile)
Arlene B. Tickner (Universidad del Rosario)

Colombia
Arlene B. Tickner (Universidad del Rosario)

Denmark
Ole Waever (University of Copenhagen)
Peter Kristensen (University of Copenhagen)

Finland
Ole Waever (University of Copenhagen)
Peter Kristensen (University of Copenhagen)

France
Frédéric Ramel (Sciences Po)
Mathilde Leloup (University of Waterloo)
Thierry Balzacq (University of Namur)

Germany
Thomas Risse (Free University of Berlin)
Wiebke Wemheuer-Vogelaar (Free University of Berlin)

Hong Kong
TRIP Principal Investigators (no local partner)

India
Navnita Chadha Behera (University of Delhi)
SP Harish (College of William & Mary)

Ireland
John Doyle (Dublin City University)

Israel
Arie Kacowicz (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Yoram Haftel (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Italy
Giovanni Andornino (University of Torino)

Japan
Takahiro Yamada (Tokyo Metropolitan University)

Mexico
Arlene B. Tickner (Universidad del Rosario)

Netherlands
Gerard van der Ree (Utrecht University)

New Zealand
Anita Lacey (University of Auckland)
Tom Gregory (University of Auckland)

Norway
Ole Waever (University of Copenhagen)
Peter Kristensen (University of Copenhagen)

Philippines
Frances Antoinette C. Cruz (University of the Philippines Diliman)
Nassef Manabilang Adiong (University of the Philippines Diliman)

Poland
Jacek Czaputowicz (University of Warsaw)
Kamil Ławniczak (University of Warsaw)

Singapore
Soo Yeon Kim (National University of Singapore)

South Africa
Peter Vale (University of Johannesburg)

South Korea
Yong-soo Eun (Hanyang University)
Chaeyoung Yong (PhD Candidate at Hanyang University)

Sweden
Ole Waever (University of Copenhagen)
Peter Kristensen (University of Copenhagen)

Switzerland
Thomas Risse (Free University of Berlin)
Wiebke Wemheuer-Vogelaar (Free University of Berlin)

Taiwan
Min-hua Huang (National Taiwan University)
Tun-jen Cheng (College of William & Mary)

Turkey
Cihan Dizdaroglu (PhD Candidate)
Mustafa Aydın (Kadir Has University)

Ukraine
Ivan Gomza (National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy)

United Kingdom
Stephanie Rickard (London School of Economics)

United States
Daniel Maliniak (William & Mary)
Susan Peterson (William & Mary)
Ryan Powers (University of Georgia)
Michael J. Tierney (William & Mary)